Tākiri Talks is a podcast series that accompanying contemporary art exhibition Tākiri: An Unfurling. The exhibition features newly commissioned work of seven Māori and pacific artists responding to national taonga 250 years after the first onshore meetings between Māori and the crew of the HMS Endeavour.

Tuia 250, described as a wānanga for the nation, has encouraged discussion and debate, reflection and contemplation about the good and the bad in our country’s history. The commemoration’s aim is to bring a broad range of perspectives to the stories that have shaped Aotearoa with the ultimate goal of tuia te muka tāngata ki uta, weaving people together for a shared future.  

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Trade: Culture created in the hulls of slave ships

In this episode of Tākiri Talks, we unfurl exploitation through different lenses of trade. We start with Australian South Sea Islander Jasmine Togo Brisby whose Tākiri work draws on the lack of awareness of her people’s history. We also join Nikau Hindin at her interactive trade installation Kāpehu Whetū, Star Compass.

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Migration: Whatever your waka

In this episode we're exploring sculptor Chris Charteris’ new work, 'Ngā Waka'. We also speak to Dame Jenny Shipley, co-chair of the Tuia 250 commemoration, about the shared migration stories of all New Zealanders and hear from Ma’ara Maeva about the nose flute

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Lost Knowledge: My ancestors were fricken smart

Here we examine disparities in the preservation of traditional knowledge. Listen to our korero with Bridget Reweti, co-curator of Tākiri: An Unfurling, and hear why Juliana Satchell-Deo says we need to change the questions in our knowledge-a-thons. Lastly, we hear from Ena Manuireva who's preserving his traditions in a myriad of ways.

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Tuia 250: Polishing the bones

Tautoko Wittika, Kaumātua from Ōrākei Marae talks to the tikanga practice of polishing the bones that have been buried in the last 250 years. Aute revivalist and Tākiri artist Nikau Hindin unfurls the problematic doctrine of discovery. Artist and sculptor Chris Charteris talks to the history, good and bad, of his home town Whitianga.

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Harvest: Cultivation during colonisation

We dig deep into the traditional Māori knowledge demonstrated in food cultivation and harvesting before the arrival of Europeans in Aotearoa. Tākiri artist, Rongomaiaia Te Whaiti, recalls the gardening prowess of her ancestors who used their produce to trade with the crew of HMS Endeavour. We speak to Wiremu Puke at Kirikiriroa/Hamilton Te Parapara gardens about using Hapu approved archaeological research to preserve the knowledge of traditional Māori cultivation.

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Identity: Perspectives and poetry

In this episode, we hear from Tākiri artist Reweti Arapere about presenting Māori narratives in a contemporary light. Poet Winari Levi shares his mission to make it cool to be Māori. And lastly, we sat down with the three curators behind Tāmaki Paenga Hira, Auckland War Memorial Museum’s exhibition, Voyage to Aotearoa Tupaia and the Endeavour, to talk about world views and the weight of Tupaia's story.

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Tākiri Talks was brought to you by Hui Te Ananui A Tangaroa, the New Zealand Maritime Museum, with funding from Pub Charity.

The Museum’s Tākiri: An Unfurling contemporary art exhibition is part of the nationwide Tuia 250 commemoration, led by the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, with special thanks to the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board Te Puna Tahua and Chisholm Whitney Charitable Trust.

This podcast was produced by Hillary Rock-Archer, Zenovia Pappapetros and Kate Orgias, and was engineered by Jol Mulholland.

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